UPDATE: Fissure 8 Advancing on Nohea, Kupono Streets

Updated at 6:20 p.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that a fast moving pahoehoe flow from fissure 8 is advancing on Nohea and Kupono Streets north of Leilani Street.

Hawai`i County Civil Defense says there are reports of lava fountains on Moku Street.

Anyone in the area, from Pomaikai to the east needs to leave the area immediately, per County officials.

The Pahoa Community Center, Kea`au Community Center, and Sure Foundation Church shelters are open.  The shelters are pet friendly.

Updated at 5 p.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that the lava flow from fissure 8 reached Pohoiki Road on Monday morning and stalled as the fissure’s activity abruptly diminished.

A few fissures reactivated briefly during the day, according to HVO’s 4:35 p.m. report.

As of the 1 p.m. overflight, Fissure 8, 18, 20, 22, 6/13, and 7/21 reactivated with Fissure 7/21 having the highest fountains.

The reactivated fissures have not yet erupted enough lava to reach the coast so the two ocean entry sites were relatively inactive.

HVO officials say only a minor ooze of residual lava was entering the ocean from the Eastern channel.

HVO field crews are on site tracking the fountains, lava flows, and spattering from multiple fissures as conditions allow and reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense. Crews are also checking on the status of ground cracks on Highway 130.

Ash continued to erupt intermittently from the vent within Halemaʻumaʻu crater, at Kīlauea’s summit. Winds have weakened and shifted in direction so that ash fall could occur in communities around the summit area.

Earthquakes in the summit region continue as the summit area subsides and adjusts to the withdrawal of magma.

Additional explosive events that could produce minor amounts of ash fall downwind are possible at any time. Volcanic gas emissions at the summit remain high.

Map as of 3 p.m. on May 28. Shaded purple areas indicate lava flows erupted in 1840, 1955, 1960, and 2014-2015. 

Updated at 1 p.m.

Hawai`i County Civil Defense says that two community meetings are scheduled for this week.

An eruption community information meeting will be held at the Pahoa High cafeteria on Tuesday, May 29 at 5 p.m.

A second meeting to discuss increasing vog and ash exposure in the Kau District will be held at the Kau High School multi-purpose room on Wednesday, May 30 at 5:30 p.m.

Original story published at 10:45 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported in its Monday morning update that overnight field crews confirmed that the fast-moving flow that broke out at about 7 p.m. Sunday night originated from fissure 8.

The fissure fed a channelized flow that moved north along the margin of the existing flow before turning east and crossing out of Leilani Estates near the intersection of Kahukai and Hookupu streets.

As of 8 a.m. Monday morning the flow had started to cross Pohoiki Road, but the advance rate slowed from hundreds of meters (yards) per hour on Sunday night to a few meters (yards) per hour Monday morning, according to HVO.

Officials say that as of 10:32 a.m. on Monday, fissures 6/13 are inactive, and Fissure 9 is reactivated but erupting small amounts of lava that are pooling nearby.

In addition HVO is reports that fissures 7/21 are no longer active and lava flows from that fissure have largely stalled on Puna Geothermal Venture property.

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high from the fissure eruptions. If a forecast shift in wind direction occurs today, widespread vog may be expected.

Magma continues to be supplied to the lower East Rift Zone. Earthquake locations have not moved farther downrift in the past few days and the number of located earthquakes remains low.

At Kilauea’s summit, ash continued to erupt intermittently from the vent within Halemaʻumaʻu crater.

HVO says a brief emission event occurred at about 4:35 a.m. on Monday and sent ash to about 10,000 feet above sea level but was not associated with a significant tilt offset.

A similar event at about 6:30 a.m. sent ash to approximately 12,000 feet above sea level.

HVO reports that earthquakes are currently occurring at high rates in the summit area.

Observations from the ground, by UAS, and by satellite during the past week have documented retreat of the summit vent walls due to collapse of the steep conduit and rim. Trade winds are causing ash fall to the southwest.

Earthquakes in the summit region continue as the summit area subsides and adjusts to the withdrawal of magma.

Additional explosive events that could produce minor amounts of ash fall downwind are possible at any time. Volcanic gas emissions at the summit remain high.